How to Use CHAR(34) Function in Excel (2 Handy Examples)

Sometimes we use double quotes to demonstrate something important or to highlight some phrase or topic. But inserting a double quote in an Excel cell is quite tricky. And to join texts that contain double quotes needs some technique. That’s when the CHAR function, including the number 34, is needed in Excel. In this article, I will show you how to use the CHAR(34) function in Excel.


Download Practice Workbook

You can download the free Excel workbook here and practice on your own.


Introduction to The CHAR Function

Summary:

The CHAR function will return a character specified by one single code number assigned from the character set for your computer.

Syntax:

The syntax or formula for the CHAR function in Excel is,


CHAR(number)

Syntax of CHAR Function in Exce;

Argument:

Argument Required/Optional Explanation
number Required Here, a number between 1 to 255 is given as an input to assign the specific character for that number.

Return:

The CHAR function will return a character specifically for the number given as an argument.

Read More: Character Codes for CHAR Function in Excel (5 Common Uses)


CHAR(34) Function in Excel

As mentioned earlier this function takes numbers between 1-255 as input. After taking input, it returns a symbol or character as the output for that ASCII number. These ASCII numbers include English letters, numbers or symbols, etc. The CHAR(34) function in Excel will return a double quote () as the output after inserting it in any phrases or Excel formulas.


2 Handy Examples of Using CHAR(34) Function in Excel

In this article, you will see two easy examples to use the CHAR(34) function (double quotes) in Excel. First of all, I will directly insert double quotes between phrases in an Excel cell by using the CHAR(34) function.  Secondly, I will apply the CHAR(34) function with multiple formulas for the same purpose.

Here, I will use the following data set to complete my procedures. I will join the phrases from the following image and turn them into a complete sentence, while Phrase 2 will have double quotes.

2 Easy Examples of Using CHAR(34) Function in Excel


Example 1: Inserting Double Quotes by Using CHAR(34) Function

In the first example, I will simply insert double quotes between two phrases using the CHAR(34) function. Also, I will demonstrate the difference between inserting double quotes in a phrase manually and using this function. For a better understanding, go through the following steps.

Step 1:

  • First of all, to make a complete sentence and add double quotes, see the following sequence in cell D5.
="My favorite "&B5&" is "&""""&C5&""""&"."
  • Here, to add the double quotes inside the phrase of cell C5, I have written two extra double quotes(“”) before and after C5 in the above sequence.

Step 2:

  • Secondly, press Enter to see the result, and you will find the double quotes before and after the book name in C5.
  • Here, applying too many double quotes will confuse the users.
  • Hence, in the following steps, I will show the use of the CHAR(34) function to do the same.

Step 3:

  • Thirdly, again in cell D5, use the following formula, that now contains the CHAR(34) function instead of the double quotes.
="My favorite "&B8&" is "&CHAR(34)&C8&CHAR(34)&"."

Inserting Double Quotes by Using CHAR(34) Function as A Easy Example of Using CHAR(34) Function in Excel

Step 4:

  • Fourthly, press Enter to see the complete sentence in cell D5.
  • Then, to get all the completed sentences through this formula in the lower cells, use AutoFill.
  • Moreover, you may have to rewrite the phrases or modify the sequence of the above formula for your own use.

Showing Final Result for Inserting Double Quotes by Using CHAR(34) Function as A Easy Example of Using CHAR(34) Function in Excel

Read More: How to Use CHAR(10) Function in Excel (3 Practical Examples)


Example 2: Applying CHAR(34) Function with Multiple Functions in Excel Formula

In this second example, I will apply the CHAR(34) function inside multiple functions. For example, I will take the IF function of Excel to demonstrate this procedure. Generally, users get the return from the IF function in a text format without any symbol or quote in it. So, I will use the CHAR(34) function to show the output from the IF function along with double quotes.

Step 1:

  • Firstly, in cell D5, use the following formula containing both IF and CHAR(34)
=IF(C5>B5,CHAR(34)&"Profit"&CHAR(34),CHAR(34)&"Loss"&CHAR(34))
  • Here, by looking at the above formula, you can notice that I added the CHAR(34) function before and after the outputs.
  • So, the IF function will return the specific output with double quotes.

Applying CHAR(34) Function with Multiple Functions in Excel Formula as A Easy Example of Using CHAR(34) Function in Excel

Step 2:

  • Secondly, press Enter to see the output with double quotes around it.
  • Then, use Fill Handle to get the desired output for the lower cells as well.

Showing Final Result for Applying CHAR(34) Function with Multiple Functions in Excel Formula as A Easy Example of Using CHAR(34) Function in Excel

Read More: How to Use CHAR(32) Formula in Excel (5 Practical Examples)


Conclusion

That’s the end of this article. I hope you find this article helpful. After reading the above description, you will be able to learn how to use CHAR(34) in Excel. Please share any further queries or recommendations with us in the comments section below.

The ExcelDemy team is always concerned about your preferences. Therefore, after commenting, please give us some moments to solve your issues, and we will reply to your queries with the best possible solutions.


Related Articles

Araf

Araf

I am Araf. I have completed my B.Sc in Industrial and Production Engineering from Ahsanullah University of Science and Technology. Currently I am working as an Excel & VBA Content Developer in Softeko. With proper guideline and aid of Softeko I want to be a flexible data analyst. With my acquired knowledge and hard work, I want to contribute to the overall growth of this organization.

We will be happy to hear your thoughts

Leave a reply

ExcelDemy
Logo